Menu

Congressional Outlook

Congressional Outlook

The House and Senate are in recess this week. Next week, the House will likely vote on a Senate-passed Congressional Review Act (CRA) disapproval resolution (S.J. Res. 57) to block Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) guidance issued on March 21, 2013 that was meant to stop discriminatory markups on indirect loans made by car dealers. During the week of May 14, the House will vote on the Agriculture and Nutrition Act of 2018 (H.R. 2), which the House Agriculture Committee marked up and passed on April 18 by a party-line vote of 26-20.

The Senate next week will vote on six federal circuit court judicial nominations: Kurt Engelhardt to be Judge for the 5th Circuit (Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas); Joel Carson III to be Judge for the 10th Circuit (Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming); John Nalbandian to be Judge for the 6th Circuit (Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Tennessee); and Michael Brennan, Michael Scudder, and Amy St. Eve to be Judges for the 7th Circuit (Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin). Senate Democrats are also preparing to force a floor vote to restore net neutrality rules repealed by President Trump's Federal Communications Commission this past December, creating a public clash they hope will help them in the midterm elections. Democrats are planning to take the procedural step May 9 to compel the vote on the CRA disapproval resolution (S.J. Res. 52), which could set up the vote as soon as the week of May 14. Senate Democrats have 50 votes lined up - more than enough to force a vote under the Congressional Review Act, but one shy of the 51 required for passage; Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) is the only Republican who has pledged support for the effort so far.
On Monday, President Trump is meeting with Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari. On Tuesady, Trump presents the Commander in Chief's trophy to the Army football team, meets with the crew of Southwest Flight 1380 and meets with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen. On Wednesday, Trump speaks at the National Teacher of the Year reception. On Thursday, Trump participates in an event for the National Day of Prayer. On Friday or Saturday, Trump is likely to address the National Rifle Association's annual meeting in Dallas, Texas.
The House and Senate are in session this week. The House will consider 7 bills under suspension of the rules, including the Music Modernization Act (H.R. 5447), which would update the management of music copyrights to account for streaming services and bulk licensing. For the remainder of the week, the House will vote on the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 (H.R. 4), which would authorize the Federal Aviation Administration at $3.35 billion each year through FY 2023 (the current FAA authorization expires on Sept. 30, 2018) and includes the text of the Disaster Recovery Reform Act, which provides reforms to FEMA's response and recovery programs, focusing on increased pre-disaster planning and mitigation; and a bill (H.R. 3144) to require dams along the Columbia River and its tributaries in the Pacific Northwest to continue using current practices regarding salmon until at least 2022, and block any action that restricts electrical generation at federal dams on the Snake River, a tributary of the Columbia River, without further congressional action explicitly authorizing it.
The House and Senate are both in session this week. The House will consider 11 bills under suspension of the rules. For the remainder of the week, the House will vote on the Home Mortgage Disclosure Adjustment Act (H.R. 2954), which would expand an exemption from mortgage loan reporting requirements to cover more lenders; the World Bank Accountability Act of 2017 (H.R. 3326), which would authorize the U.S. government to contribute $3.29 billion over three years to the World Bank's International Development Association, fulfilling the Trump Administration's request to reduce the authorization level by 15 percent; and the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act (H.R. 4712), which would allow medical professionals to be criminally charged and subjected to civil liability if they do not provide medical care to a child that survives an abortion procedure.

Navigation